Category Archives: Nautical archaeology

The Elissa: The Untold Story

I was recently in Galveston, and I stopped by to see the tall ship Elissa. She wasn’t there, but before too long she pulled into view and I snapped the above picture. For those who aren’t familiar, the Elissa is … Continue reading

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The Return of the Charles W. Morgan

As a child, I spent a lot of time at the Mystic Seaport Museum in Mystic, Conn. As I discuss in The Man Who Thought Like a Ship, it was among my father’s favorite maritime museums, and we often stopped there … Continue reading

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Charleston and the Ship Model Jesus

Last week, I was in Charleston, S.C., to speak to the Nautical Research Guild about my father’s Egyptian ship model and how he used models in researching ancient ship construction. The guild is a national group of ship modelers and … Continue reading

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Texas A&M, Israel and the `Jesus Boat’

Texas A&M University may be considering a campus in Israel, according to the Bryan/College Station Eagle. Citing “sources close to the situation,” the paper said A&M officials have made repeated trips to Israel to negotiate a partnership and that an announcement … Continue reading

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The `Lost Ship Model’ is finally home

Last week, I was on the Texas A&M University campus, and I stopped by the headquarters of the Institute of Nautical Archaeology to see the display of the “Lost Ship Model.” The rendering of an Egyptian ship from about 1400 … Continue reading

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The Cornwallis Connection

Last week,  I was walking around downtown Charlotte, N.C.. Standing in front of the Bank of America tower, I noticed a marker indicating I was at the site of the Battle of Charlotte, which occurred on Sept. 26, 1780. Back … Continue reading

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`Steffy’s First Ship Model’

The latest issue of the INA Quarterly has a couple of items about which I’m excited. The first is the cover story, “Steffy’s First Ship Model,” which is a reworked version of the story I wrote last year for the … Continue reading

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A `Roundtable’ Review

At the end of last year, I participated in a “roundtable review” for The Man Who Thought Like a Ship.  I’d never done anything like it before, and I must admit, I’d never even heard of this sort of thing until … Continue reading

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Father’s Day

Publisher’s Weekly just put out its list of the “10 Worst Dads in Books,” which seems like bad timing just before Father’s Day. While the article notes that “bad dads turn up less in fiction than bad moms,” the issue … Continue reading

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The debut of Nautical Discoveries

Interested in knowing more about what’s going on in nautical archaeology? Since writing The Man Who Thought Like a Ship, I’ve found that information on the web is sparse and scattered. I’ve compiled a magazine on Flipboard, Nautical Discoveries, which collects information … Continue reading

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